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Black Voices

Yes, our basic human right to live matters. The fact that our pigmentation is a target of death and destruction is a crime against humanity. We are in the midst of one of the world's longest -- and visible -- genocides. But what happens when we are no longer just treated like raccoons? The omnipresent pest of city streets, devoid of human dignity, one to be exterminated and only recognized upon our untimely deaths?
"There are good black women out there you know," she says to me. This is the beginning of a short conversation I have with a stranger on the train after my wife kisses me goodbye and exits at her stop. These are the moments that have been a constant since we first met.
It's 2015, and racism is far from eradicated. In the short but powerful documentary above from the New York Times, a group
I attended the taping of BET's 'Black Girls Rock' award show in Newark, New Jersey. Since my blog talks about all things a "hot mess," I decided to ask the carpet walkers for some advice on a living hot mess-free!
The Book of Negroes is reminding me how much my ancestors endured just to survive. It makes me feel obligated to live out my full potential so their pain and struggle isn't in vain. On the ratings front, it will be interesting to see how The Book of Negroes compares to BET's other primetime specials. This is important, because we want networks to continue telling these stories.
It would dawn on me that as a young black male in casual street clothes at midnight in the act of placing hospital property into my personal bag, there was a likelihood that she thought I was stealing.
I won't go into the details of black groups being marginalized at the hands of white people who dominate the "center," because if you're smart enough to think that you fooled us into feeling remorse for "leaving you out" during the protest in Toronto, then you're smart enough to do a Google search to figure out historical black oppression and its endless contemporary reproductions.
A lesbian couple was informed that their egg had been inseminated not with the desired sperm of the white, blonde-haired, blue-eyed donor, but with that of the black male, the result of a clerical error. Where the outrage has ensued is with the couple's $50,000 wrongful birth lawsuit.
Somewhere out there Drake needs to stand up and write a song about this fact for people to understand that his OVO concert takes place on a weekend made possible by a person that fought for the freedom of his ancestors. Well, at least the black half of his ancestors.
The same issues of white versus black racism aren't as deeply woven into Canadian society. Think this is what Whoopi was trying to get at. But racism and discrimination still exist. It has the same purpose it has in the U.S. Just because it's coming out of the mouth of a Canadian doesn't change its meaning or context. People in Canada still want to touch a black woman's braids with amazement and wonder. Canadian cities have pockets of poor community housing disproportionately populated by blacks. The racial issues are still there. They're just served up on a different platter, because it's a different country, with a different history.